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Hướng dẫn chọn Primer cho phản ứng PCR

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Primer Selection Guidelines: Good Primers Important for PCR and Automated Sequencing
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DNA synthesis is the production of short, single-stranded DNA molecules (called primers or oligonucleotides) often used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA amplification for Sanger sequencing applications. The region of DNA amplified is determined by an exact match of the primer to its complimentary bases on a given DNA strand. Primer sequences are determined from known sequence since there must be a match to the region of DNA to be amplified.
PCR amplification requires 2 primers that determine the region of sequence amplified in the forward and reverse direction. The forward primer is designed along one strand in the direction toward the reverse primer. Likewise, the reverse primer is designed from the complimentary strand. PCR is exponential amplification in which the newly generated PCR fragment from one cycle also acts as a template for the next cycle (Figure 1A).
Amplification of DNA for Sanger sequencing differs from PCR in that a single primer is used. Amplification is the reproduction of one strand using the compliment from the original strand. Newly generated PCR fragments are single stranded and do not provide a complimentary strand that could act as a template for additional amplification (Figure 1B).
Differences in amplification between PCR and Sanger sequencing were discussed previously (Sanger Sequencing Amplification Compared to Basic PCR).


Simply designing the sequence of the primer from known sequence does not ensure the primer will anneal to the desired region and initiate amplification. The primer should be designed following a set of given standards that improve the chances of success. The guidelines for designing primers used in PCR and sequencing are fairly similar. Primers are designed in the 5’ to 3’ direction to compliment the direction of amplification.
For those utilizing PCR and Sanger sequencing in everyday applications, primer design could seem like yesterday’s news. However, we still believe reviewing good primer design guidelines is helpful to any researcher involved in genetic research.


Guidelines for Primer Design


G1. Primer length should be in the range of 18 to 22 bases. Primers less than 18 bases will have a low melting temperature (Tm values) and might not anneal to the template. There is some flexibility for designing primers longer than 18 bases. Longer primers are frequently designed from template regions that are AT-rich and need additional bases to increase the Tm value.
G2. The primer should have GC content of 50% to 55%.   This is the equivalent of 9 or 10 GC bases included in an 18 base primer. Sometimes there are regions on a template that are AT-rich which prevents meeting this guideline. In those cases it is recommended to design a primer longer than 18 bases.
G3. Primers should have a GC-lock on the 3’ end. A GC-lock is designed when 2 of the final 3 bases is a G or a C. The 3’ base should always be a G or a C.
G4. The melting temperature of any good primer should be in the range of 50OC to 55OC. However, guidelines particularly related to Tm value have some flexibility. Melting temperatures are directly related to the PCR cycle annealing temperature. Tm values that are too low may not anneal well during PCR. High values could be too stringent causing difficulty locating the correct annealing site on the template.
G5. The primer should not include poly base regions. This is when 4 or more bases in a row are the same. This guideline helps prevent potential slippage in which the primer shifts from the annealed position.
G6. Four or more bases that compliment either direction of the primer should be avoided. This prevents the primer from annealing to itself and forming what is referred to as primer-dimer. Primer-dimers have the capability of amplifying the primer itself causing short secondary sequence.
PCR Specific Guidelines
G7. Forward and reverse primers used in PCR amplification should have similar melting temperatures (+/- 2OC). This allows a 4OC difference in total melting temperatures. Researchers involved in using PCR amplification will use primer Tm values in an effort to optimize PCR cycles. Similar Tm values for forward and reverse primers aid optimization efforts. Multiplex PCR applications using multiple primer pairs should all have similar Tm values. A wide range in primer melting temperature complicates PCR optimization.
G8. Forward and reverse primers should not have regions 4 bases or longer that compliment. Just like a primer used in Sanger sequencing, forward and reverse primers used in PCR can anneal to each other and form primer-dimers.
G9. The Tm values for tailed primers should include the tail in calculating melting temperature. Yes, melting temperatures will be greater than 55OC. However, the additional bases in the tail will add to the amplified PCR fragment and become part of the priming site. Tailed primers are often used to add restriction sites to an amplified product.
Primer design is an important aspect relating to many forms of PCR including basic PCR, fragment analysis, quantitative analysis and Sanger sequencing. Below is a link that offers free primer design software…
http://frodo.wi.mit.edu/
We invite any additional guidelines or comments that may be useful to both experienced researchers and those new to primer design.

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